Dracula (Bram Stoker)

Although the idea of vampires had already been popular in folklore long before Bram Stoker wrote Dracula, his adaptation of the tale lead to the creation of one of literature’s most symbolically sexualized characters. Dracula have proven the 1897 novel to be truly timeless. It is arguably one of the most beloved classics of gothic literature. However, relying loosely on the text, modern renditions habitually bypass the more controversial subjects of fear within the text as those fears relate to female sexuality and homosexuality. By examining the Victorian era in which Dracula was written, looking closely at how the female characters are portrayed, the gender relations between the characters, and the blatant homosexual undertones of the novel, this reflection will explore how the classic seamlessly manipulates the themes of women’s sexuality, gender inversion, and also the point of view of Bram Stoker. “Dracula” becomes the famous horror novel in the 15th century and also an inspired many horror stories after that. Click on the title to read the full review.

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