Intimacy: Trusting Oneself and the Other. Insights for a new way of living (Osho)

This book is an invitation to dig deeper into the self and find out who you really are in order to create synchronicity between thought and action, inviting others to truly connect with us. When we wear masks we create dysfunction in our internal mechanism, so that when we want to smile it becomes forced, and when we truly want to love, we have forgotten how or what it means. When we fail to embrace the less perfect side of ourselves that has been forgotten and shamed, the stronger that side becomes and takes control of our actions forming a life of its own. Click on the title to read the full review.

Fact Fullness (Hans Rosling)

When asked simple questions about global trends- what percentage of the world's population lives in poverty; why the world population is increasing; how many girls finish school- we systematically get the answers wrong" (Rosling). As an economist, I found this book to be quite refreshing and optimistic about our present and the future. The author employs some elements of behavioral economics to explain human bias towards negative thinking. Rosling provides some rules of thumb to retrain our brains to think differently and challenge the unconscious bias that leads to poor decision making. He goes as far as to say that the most educated people are the ones who hold the most incorrect assumptions about the world. Definitely a must read for managers and executives making decisions on behalf of large corporations as wrong perceptions can lead to a loss in market opportunities. Click on the title to read the full review.

The Art of Happiness (His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler)

This book makes an important distinction between happiness and joy indicating that the latter creates a more positive state of mind than the former. This is the example used by his holiness: "The feeling of happiness is similar to a high, that can be felt during an event or when achieving a specific goal that we are pursuing, and therefore, happiness can feel like it is constantly eluding us. Thus the search for happiness can lead to long periods of resentment, frustration and low self esteem." Click on the title to read the full review.

Bulshit Jobs: a theory (D. Graeber)

"Your job is more like a boss' unzipped fly that everyone can see but also knows better than to mention." This is a good read for those looking to demystify the emotional realities of the post industrial labor market while doing so with some humor. Graeber compares wage labor to slavery and an alternative form of sadomasochism that has been widely accepted in our societies. If you feel like you don't know what the heck you are supposed to do in your job and live with constant fear that they will realize that there is no reason for it to exist, you are not alone. Click on the title to read the full review.

Dracula (Bram Stoker)

Although the idea of vampires had already been popular in folklore long before Bram Stoker wrote Dracula, his adaptation of the tale lead to the creation of one of literature’s most symbolically sexualized characters. Dracula have proven the 1897 novel to be truly timeless. It is arguably one of the most beloved classics of gothic literature. However, relying loosely on the text, modern renditions habitually bypass the more controversial subjects of fear within the text as those fears relate to female sexuality and homosexuality. By examining the Victorian era in which Dracula was written, looking closely at how the female characters are portrayed, the gender relations between the characters, and the blatant homosexual undertones of the novel, this reflection will explore how the classic seamlessly manipulates the themes of women’s sexuality, gender inversion, and also the point of view of Bram Stoker. “Dracula” becomes the famous horror novel in the 15th century and also an inspired many horror stories after that. Click on the title to read the full review.

Misbehaving (Richard H. Thaler)

This book is an excellent read for anyone desiring to become smarter about money and decision making in general. It is also a must read for social scientists, especially those interested in formulating effective public policy. Click on the title to read the full review.

Everybody Lies (Stephens- Davidowitz)

This book uses a powerful digital truth serum to extract some insights about human nature and the reasons why we lie. Click on the title to read the full review.

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