The Lobster (2019)

This film employs a dystopian setting to depict the reality of the binary world that we live in and the poor mating choices that people make based on fear. This is a very dark comedy that treads lightly on the edge of tragedy. The major take away of this movie is that unlike we have been told, love is not blind. Click on the title to read the full review.

Inception (2010)

Inception is another masterpiece from Christopher Nolan and it is considered cinematography at its finest. This movie is so layered that it is hard to keep this review brief. The plot centers on dreams within dreams if that were possible. The imagery switches between time and setting using cinematography as a guiding point to keep the story together. Sit tight and prepare to feast your eyes and your imagination, this is going to be a wild ride. Click on the title to read the full article.

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

The story balances on a tight rope between mental illness and an amazing capacity for creativity, reminding us of the link between deep trauma and an active imagination. Perhaps this is why some of the greatest artists in history were also often tortured by demons. Click on the title to read the full article.

Alice in Wonderland (2010)

Although the book is considered literary nonsense, I think that Charles Dodgson conveys the very familiar feeling of disconcert that we all experience while going through different life stages. The book was written in 1865 but somehow managed to remain timeless when it comes to describing the struggle between societal pressures and a coming of age. Click on the title to read the full article.

Black Mirror

I love this Netflix show because it is very sci-fi and controversial. It is the type of series that can spark good conversation among friends about almost any topic. Every episode portrays a twisted dystopia based on the secondary effects of using technology even with good intentions. Click on the title to read the full article.

Fight Club (1999)

Cornelius (the protagonist) lives a relative stable but very lonely life. The film employs many metaphors to describe the journey of a man dealing with onset depression. The denial of his own need for deeper connections pushes him to exchange one addiction for another. Toxic masculinity is the glue that keeps the story together and moves it forward. Click on the title to read the full article.

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