Russian Doll- (2019)

The plot centers around Nadia, who seems like a typical New Yorker, working as a software developer, and living a life of excess. It's her 36th birthday, and while it would be normal for her to feel happy that her friends are throwing her a party, she seems quite disengaged. Something is not right from the beginning. Nadia starts off the night by bailing from her own party to spend the night with a stranger, only to end up dying... again and again. Click on the title to read the full review.

Big Fish (2003)

This is another one of Tim Burton's masterpieces. I really appreciate his eye for detail and the way he invites viewers to immerse themselves into his vision. The cinematography in this movie has magical qualities. I found myself thinking about metaphorical imagery used by Tim Burton to depict how our recollection of personal experiences seem to morph as we revisit relationships and situations during different life stages. Heightened or diminished senses can play tricks on us, leading us to think that the world has changed around us, when in fact, it us and our perception of things that has changed. Suddenly, someone who was seen as a warm and caring character can become a cold hearted ogre when the bond is broken or the contact diminished. Click on the title to read the full review.

Parasite (2019)

What is true wealth? Money, assets or connections? This is a very dark and complex drama that touches upon life perception from poverty and wealth extremes. A story about class told like never before. Although it would seem like the poor people act as parasites of the rich, it is unclear who the parasite is in this movie. Click on the title to read the full review

The Danish Girl (2015)

In my view this is a true love story, of a love so great that was able to evolve with the individuals as they grew into their true selves. This is a tale of a love that transcends genders, relationship labels and it lasted a lifetime despite the constant pain and disappointment. Click on the title to read the full review.

Fight Club (1999)

Cornelius (the protagonist) lives a relative stable but very lonely life. The film employs many metaphors to describe the journey of a man dealing with onset depression. The denial of his own need for deeper connections pushes him to exchange one addiction for another. Toxic masculinity is the glue that keeps the story together and moves it forward. Click on the title to read the full article.

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